Wii Shop Channel Guide for SEGA Fans – Screen Setup, Master System & Arcade

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We are still a little under a month before Nintendo disables the ability to add funds to your Wii Shop credit to their aging Shop Channel up to the ultimate shut down in January of next year. This guide will cover the must-haves of the SEGA Master System and SEGA-related Virtual Console Arcade titles. While both haven’t received nearly as many Genesis or Mega Drive titles SEGA put out some notable releases you can’t get anywhere else. In addition we’ll be checking out screen setups for those who want the ultimate retro gaming setup to those who can’t break away from their modern HD setups. The Wii provides solutions that will work for everyone who has an interest in SEGA’s vintage lineup.

All screenshots are captured on real Wii U hardware outputting at 720p downscaled to 480p. You’ll also find Sonic Retro and SEGA Retro articles to check out for additional information as well as box art and manual scans you don’t get to see in these re-releases.

Wii Shop Channel Guide for SEGA Fans – Controller Adapters, Mega Drive & Genesis

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The Wii Shop Channel is beginning it’s operations to shut down the service on the 30th of January in 2019. Nintendo put out a reminder that the service will prevent you from being able to add points to purchase games from their service March 26th.

Not only will you be unable to redownload games you purchased from the service after the shutdown date, this will take away several games that include titles that are very difficult to find in the after market. Leading up to the closure of the service we will be posting articles featuring games that SEGA fans will want to keep their eyes on. SEGA has been a major supporter for the service since the beginning of Nintendo’s foray into the digital market. Starting off with titles from the Mega Drive and the Genesis, the service grew to provide cult favorites, rare and valuable titles and even imports from Japan. There are also a few WiiWare titles to consider, exclusive games that were hampered by small file size limits for developers and lack of advertising. We won’t exactly be recommending recommend Sonic 4 Episode 1, but it is worth mentioning since it will no longer be on sale.

A User’s Guide to Puyo Puyo Tsu (Puyo Puyo 2)


3D Puyo Puyo 2, better known under the Japanese name Puyo Puyo Tsu, is one of several games as part of the upcoming SEGA 3D Classic Collection. Puyo Puyo Tsu is considered an arcade classic in Japan, with it being played on a high level even today and setting the standards for future Puyo Puyo games like the concept of offsetting, All Clear, and standardizing four colors. But playing the game might be intimidating since for people this might be the first time playing the game. Luckily this guide will explain how the game works so you can feel more confident.

SEGA Import Guide: Cool Cool Toon (SEGA Dreamcast)


More than eight years since the death of SEGA’s final console, SEGA fans have been left digging deeper and deeper into their console’s libraries, looking for new games to play. Though impressions, reviews and videos for SEGA’s English language releases are typically easy to find, information on their console’s Japanese exclusive selection of games can be quite elusive. That is why we at SEGAbits are launching a new feature focused on the quality and playability of SEGA console regional exclusives. Today, we will be looking at an obscure rhythm game released by SNK exclusively for the Dreamcast in mid-2000: Cool Cool Toon. I’d like to give a special shout out to my niece for getting me this for my birthday!

Cool Cool Toon is a unique game in SNK’s Dreamcast library. A rhythm game made from the ground up for the Dreamcast, it was neither a fighting game nor an arcade port. It is so far removed from what SNK did for the system that it doesn’t even look like an SNK game at first glance. It does share one common thread with other SNK games though: it is very easy to pick up and play.

A User’s Guide to Darxide for the SEGA 32X


Since the day I joined SEGAbits, one of my goals has always been to shed light and draw attention to some of the more obscure games in SEGA’s history. With 32X month in full swing, it just didn’t seem right to let the month pass without writing some kind of article that sheds light on one of the rarest titles in the system’s small library: Darxide. This is a game that few people have played and even fewer people know how to play, so today I’m not only going to go over the history of the game, I’m also going to explain its mechanics so that if you do ever get to play the game, you’ll know how.