New Madou Monogatari Game Gear collection announced

Madou GG

A new collection for the Madou Monogatari by D4 Enterprises and Project EGG has been announced. A follow up from past collections, such as the Mega Drive version of Madou Monogatari I and Madou Monogatari: Hanamaru Dai Youchienji ones previously reported, collection focuses on the Game Gear versions of Madou Monogatari I, II, III, and A. In addition to these game, the collection will also come with reprints of the manuals and a soundtrack, similar to the other Madou Monogatari collections.

Unlike the original Madou Monogatari I-II-III, the Game Gear versions were originally separate releases. These versions of the original trilogy contain elements of both the MSX and PC98 versions, still retaining the first person dungeon exploring and turn based battles. However they also introduce some changed elements, for example the Game Gear version of Madou Monogatari III has Rulue as the final boss instead of Minotaur like the other versions. Meanwhile Madou Monogatari A (technically called Madou Monogatari A: Doki Doki Vacation) is a remake of the “A” scenario from Madou Monogatari A-R-S, focusing on a 4 year old Arle obtaining her powers for the first time. Only the “A” scenario got a Game Gear remake, possibly due to it being a late 1995 Game Gear release.

The collection is slated for a 2018 release for 8,000円 (roughly $72)

[Source: Compile Station]

Opinion: Why Puyo Puyo Chronicles is getting attention outside of Japan

puyopuyoeditorial

This article is from the opinion of the author only. None of the statements here are necessarily associated with SEGABits or SEGA as a whole.

Puyo Puyo Chronicles. This was a game that was expected to come out for the majority of the year, since it’s the 25th Anniversary of the franchise. Normally when it comes to anniversaries SEGA focuses their cards on Sonic, but people outside of Japan don’t know Puyo Puyo also gets attention with a sudden boom of merchandising and a new game. This also happened with Puyo Puyo’s 15th and 20th anniversary, where they got rather expansive games in the form of Puyo Puyo! 15th Anniversary and Puyo Puyo!! 20th Anniversary, respectively. The fact the franchise has endured for 25 years defying the “hiatus” problem many of SEGA’s franchises suffer from for one reason or another, should be a testament to it’s strength as an IP.

However, something is notably different this time around in contrast to the past.

Puyo Puyo Tsu 3D getting an independent 3DS eShop release

Puyo Puyo Tsu 3D

Puyo Puyo Tsu (or Puyo Puyo 2) is regarded as an arcade classic in Japan, setting the foundation for future titles with it’s fleshed out mechanics. Which is why recently the game received not only a 3D remake on the 3DS, but also made it one of the exclusive titles to SEGA 3D Reprint Archives Vol. 2 (SEGA 3D Classics Collection outside of Japan). That is until recently, where it’s been announced the game will receive an independent version on the eShop, and adding an additional Tournament Mode on top of the base game. This version will release on August 3rd, 2016 for the price of ¥864 ($8.22) in Japan.

Whether or not the similarly exclusive Power Drift 3D or the Master System games will receive an independent release too is currently in the air. No release for outside of Japan is currently announced, but keep an eye out in the near future.

If you want to learn more about Puyo Puyo Tsu 3D, read up on our review of SEGA 3D Classic Collection which includes Puyo Puyo Tsu 3D, and our guide on Puyo Puyo Tsu that talks about how the game works.

[Source: Nintendo Japan]

 

D4 and EGG Project release new Madou Monogatari collection

madoumonogatari

After the success of the first collection with Madou Monogatari 1-2-3 and Madou Monogatari ARS, a new compilation has been released for Windows in Japan regarding to the Madou Monogatari series called Madou Monogatari yu~ Kyoku Taizen-Tsu MD & DS by companies D4 and EGG Project. In this collection contains the Mega Drive version of Madou Monogatari I and varies DiscStation titles, along with the original cover from the Mega Drive Madou Monogatari I and an OST. In addition, the first collection that contains Madou Monogatari 1-2-3 and Madou Monogatari ARS is receiving a reprint until September 2016.

A User’s Guide to Puyo Puyo Tsu (Puyo Puyo 2)

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3D Puyo Puyo 2, better known under the Japanese name Puyo Puyo Tsu, is one of several games as part of the upcoming SEGA 3D Classic Collection. Puyo Puyo Tsu is considered an arcade classic in Japan, with it being played on a high level even today and setting the standards for future Puyo Puyo games like the concept of offsetting, All Clear, and standardizing four colors. But playing the game might be intimidating since for people this might be the first time playing the game. Luckily this guide will explain how the game works so you can feel more confident.

GameFactory releases PC game Magical Stone, a competitive puzzle game inspired by Puyo Puyo

Japanese developer GameFactory has released a free to play beta of a new PC game called Magical Stone, a competitive falling puzzle game like Puyo Puyo. This game was developed to pander to the “eSports” crowd by focusing on a strong multiplayer presence, with features like rankings and tournaments to encourage players to improve their skills, in addition to creating a “pro” online version of Puyo Puyo for anyone to try. Progress is already being made to reach these goals, as competitive Puyo Puyo group Samurai Frontier Gaming is supporting the game, along with an official tournament on June 25th 2016 with cash prizes that will be the first season of possibly more.

Developer Retrospective: The winning combination of SEGA and Compile

Compile_YOSD

As summer winds down, we thought it would be the ideal time to shift the focus of our Year of the Developers feature to third party Japanese developers who have worked with SEGA in the past to bring us countless classics. We are, of course, referring to the legendary developers Compile, Treasure and Westone. While these three developers existed on their own outside of SEGA, their collaborations with our favorite company utilizing beloved SEGA home console and arcade hardware went a long way in cementing their statuses as some of the best third party developers of the 80s and 90s.