Metacritic ranks SEGA as their #1 publisher of 2015

SEGAMetacriticPublisher2015While SEGA didn’t release a lot of games during their 2015 year, the critics seemed to like the games they did release. From their SEGA 3D Classics to niche Japanese titles like Hatsune Miku: Project Mirai DX.  Metacritic ranks SEGA as their #1 publisher of 2015, beating the likes of companies like Sony Computer Entertainment, TellTale Games and yeah, even Nintendo. It seems that people already are calling this unfair due to most of the titles being re-releases, but their really good and add new content. I suggest people having issues with this to ask Metacritic to change the rules. When was the last time you could say ‘Metacritic ranks SEGA #1’?

Here are the list of publishers and how they ranked:

  1. SEGA – 77.1%
  2. Telltale Games – 74.6%
  3. Sony – 74.4%
  4. Activision Blizzard – 72%
  5. Devolver Digital – 73.5%
  6. Nintendo – 71.7%
  7. EA – 71.9%
  8. Bandai Namco – 69.5%
  9. Ubisoft – 69.9%

Seems that SEGA’s new stradegy of releasing fewer titles but making sure the titles that are released are of ‘good to great’ quality might be the solution to rebuilding their brand. This year we have (in the west) games like Valkyria Chronicles Remastered, Yakuza 0 (maybe), 7th Dragon III: Code VFC, Sonic Boom: Fire & Ice, Total War: Warhammer, SEGA 3D Classics Collection, and even that rumored Sonic 25th Anniversary game. If all goes as planned, SEGA might top the list again. Metacritic ranks SEGA #1, how do you feel about this?

Hatsune Miku: Project Mirai DX sold 24k copies in America on its debut month

Hatsune Miku Project Mirai DXAccording to NeoGAF user creamsugar (who is NeoGAF famous for leaking NPD sale numbers), Hatsune Miku: Project Mirai DX sold a total 24,000 units (estimated, physical only) in all of September. The game came out on September 8th, this would mean that it would have had 22 days on store shelves. Is this good or bad? Well, seeing as how Hatsune Miku: Project Diva f  on Playstation Vita sold 16,000 units back in 2013 and that was good enough for SEGA to bring more after that, I would say its good enough.

One of the reasons that these games don’t have to sell more than, lets say, something like Yakuza is because of the cost of translation. The more words, the more money. Of course there is more factors but that’s another topic for another day. What do you guys think? Is 24k too low for a niche rhythm game?

Review: Hatsune Miku: Project Mirai DX (Nintendo 3DS)

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If you read last week’s preview, you’d know that I was feeling quite positive about what I had experienced in playing SEGA’s latest Nintendo 3DS title Hatsune Miku: Project Mirai DX. Now that I’ve had an additional week, I’ve experienced a bit more of what the game has to offer. Rhythm modes have ramped up the difficulty factor, I’ve been able to experience the game’s StreetPass/SpotPass functions, and it was even a certain vocaloid’s birthday. SO without further ado, let’s turn on the lights, grab a mic, and hit the stage for our review of Hatsune Miku: Project Mirai DX!

Preview: Hatsune Miku: Project Mirai DX (Nintendo 3DS)

Hatsune Miku Project Mirai DX

Thanks to an advance review copy, I’ve been having fun with Miku for close to two weeks now. While this is merely a preview and not a full-on review of the game (which will post on September 4th before the game releases), I did want to give some early impressions from the point of view of a Hatsune Miku newbie.

That’s right, despite contributing to SEGA fan sites since Miku made her SEGA debut in 2009, I have not laid hands on a Miku game until I received my download code for Hatsune Miku: Project Mirai DX. Prior to this, I reported the occasional press release, posted trailers when they hit, and sat on the sidelines while fellow fans either bemoaned the franchise or celebrated it. Up until now, I knew about the vocaloid craze, I knew that that the SEGA developed games were rhythm based, and I loved the Domino’s Japan campaign as evidenced by my earlier reference to it. But outside of that? Miku was a mystery. But not anymore. So now that I’ve finally had a chance to play a Hatsune Miku game, what do I think of it so far and what do I think the average SEGA fan will enjoy? Let’s find out!

Hatsune Miku: Project Mirai DX delayed to September a week before release

 

Hatsune Miku Project Mirai DX

I hope you weren’t looking forward to playing Hatsune Miku: Project Mirai DX, because SEGA has announced that they’ve delayed the game just a little over a week before it was originally supposed to be released. Instead of being in stores next week, the game will now release on September 8th in North America and September 11th in Europe. SEGA hasn’t announced a delay for the Japanese version of the game that was announced later on, so it will seemingly still be released there on May 28th.

SEGA also announced a special Launch Edition for North America, which includes “premium outer box packaging” and a wallet chain that’s based on Hatsune Miku’s belt. All physical copies will also include 19 double sided AR cards that let you see various dance moves and costumes. As for European stores getting this special edition: ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

 

Swingin’ Report Show #78: Interview with Sam Mullen, Localization Producer, SEGA of America

On this episode of the SEGAbits Swingin’ Report Show, we’re joined by SEGA of America Localization Producer Sam Mullen! In his role at SEGA, Sam has managed the localization process of several Japanese titles including Binary Domain, Rise of Nightmares, and the Hatsune Miku titles. Currently he is working on SEGA’s line of 3D Classics titles which include arcade and SEGA Genesis favorites as well as Hatsune Miku: Project Mirai DX for the Nintendo 3DS.

Learn about what the process of localization entails as well as what to expect from SEGA’s upcoming 3DS titles in this week’s show! Oh, and see a surprise cameo from former Brand Manager Aaron Webber who happened to be at SEGA of America HQ while we were recording this episode.

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SEGA returns to MomoCon showcasing Project Mirai DX, Tembo, 3D Classics & more!

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MomoCon has recently announced the return of SEGA’s appearance to this year’s convention event with panels and first playable demos of a number of unreleased games from their lineup! These games include the upcoming Nintendo 3DS games Hatsune Miku: Project Mirai DX and the entire SEGA 3D Classics arcade roster. Also for consoles the first North American playable demos of TEMBO THE BADASS ELEPHANT, and Dengeki Bunko: Fighting Climax!

I will be attending the convention once again to interview the cool reps from SEGA of America on their line-up titles for the summer and will be bringing you coverage and videos from the convention floors. If you have any questions on the following titles, be sure to leave a comment below.

SEGA unleashes Hatsune Miku Project Mirai DX trailer

Today is Hatsune Miku day so SEGA of Japan has released a trailer for their upcoming title, Hatsune Miku Project Mirai DX on the Nintendo 3DS. Project Mirai DX is suppose to be a re-release of the 2nd game in the series which is enhanced and will be the first 3DS Hatsune Miku game to be release in North America and Europe.

Unlike Hatsune Miku Project Diva games on arcades and Sony handhelds, Project Mirai features chibi versions of the main character cast which is unique to the 3DS platform.

You will be able to pick the game up for yourself in May 26th in North America and May 29th in Europe.

SEGA announces Hatsune Miku: Project Mirai DX global release dates

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SEGA has announced the global release dates for the upcoming Nintendo 3DS title Hatsune Miku: Project Mirai DX! The game will be releasing to North America on May 26th of this year, hitting both store shelves and Nintendo’s digital download service the eShop. Fans in Japan and Korea can expect a May 28th release, and Europe will follow on May 29th. Hatsune Miku: Project Mirai DX isn’t your usual Hatsune Miku game, as SEGA has teamed with Good Smile Company to present the characters in their chibi-style Nendoroid figure style. You may remember that Miku and Sonic got the Nendoroid treatment, and as somebody who owns the Sonic figure, I can tell you that Good Smile Company does a fantastic job with both the physical figures, and the Nendoroid redesign.

After the break, check out a full press release, a trailer, and gallery of images!