The House of the Dead Prototype Discovered After 21 Years


Arcade provider, AndyGeezerServices and Youtuber, KawaiiYinYang had released pictures and footage of the prototype version of The House of the Dead for the SEGA Model 2 arcade hardware on the internet after 21 years. The prototype features two playable levels and tons of unused content such as a different introduction, dialogue, animation, and sound effects (which one of them happens to be the “Reload!” sound from the Virtua Cop series). The prototype may have also been possibly used in a couple of tradeshows back in Japan around the time.

AndyGeezerServices submitted the prototype to MAME and we hope it’ll be open to the public for newer discoveries to come. Hit the jump to take a look at the prototype version of the original House of the Dead.

Rare 1987 SEGA arcade game Bullet now playable at Galloping Ghost Arcade

The largest arcade in the world, Galloping Ghost Arcade in Brookfield, IL, has appeared quite a bit on our news page thanks to their continued efforts to make as many games playable as possible in their ever expanding lineup of machines (at well over 600). Their latest addition is a unique title from SEGA’s arcade past: 1987’s shoot ’em up Bullet. Developed by AM1 and playing similarly to Smash TV, the game is quite rare. According to Galloping Ghost only a few boards are known to exist and the one in their possession is the only one in the United States. The game uses two sticks, one for shooting and one for moving. Aesthetically, the game resembles Alien Syndrome and appears to recycle assets from Golden Axe.

If you want to play the game for yourself, head on over to Galloping Ghost the next time your in the Chicagoland area. If you can’t make it over, stay tuned to SEGAbits as we plan to head over there for an arcade game review. Thanks to Galloping Ghost for reviving this lost game!

SEGA Games That Are Celebrating Big Anniversaries in 2016

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SEGA has created some highly popular and cult classic series of games that have stuck with people over the years. While most of you guys already know that Sonic the Hedgehog is celebrating his big 25th Anniversary this year, many other games get ignored because they aren’t as relevant as they used to be. Today we will list those mostly ignored video game franchises we all love. Did your favorite game make our list?

The History of Sega Japan R&D, Part 3: Innovative Heights and the End of an Era

REUNIFICATION AND TWELVE INNOVATIVE R&D STUDIOS

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Playing up an executive managing director and joking about the state of the Dreamcast at the time, says a lot about Sega’s attitude at the time.

In Part 2 we covered Sega’s golden age, but great heights inevitably can bring great lows. Sega had lots of up and downs throughout their history. They also had great games, lots of them! But ultimately Sega did not make that much money from the Saturn. However, in the arcades they did absolute gangbusters. Sega needed to change their approach in regards to development and also their hardware. The solution was to make the Dreamcast and NAOMI arcade hardware the same and have all of the internal studios make games for it,in turn allowing them further grow and prosper. Twelve R&D studios in total were established, and the nine software studios were not split into arcade and console divisions – they made games for everything. Hisashi Suzuki and Yu Suzuki would manage the arcade business, with Hisashi putting in his final stretch at Sega before retirement.

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The History of Sega Japan R&D, Part 2: The 90s Golden Age

THE NUMBER ONE ARCADE ENTERPRISE

The Model series of arcade hardware by Yu Suzuki in co-operation with Lockhead Martin, where the next step in the Sega arcade world. Virtua Fighter sold Sega Saturns in Japan.

The Model series of arcade hardware by Yu Suzuki in co-operation with Lockhead Martin, where the next step in the Sega arcade world. Virtua Fighter sold Sega Saturns in Japan.

In Part 1, we looked at Sega’s origins and their Japanese game development during the 80s. In Part 2 we turn our attention to the golden age, when Sega was fought in the console wars and arcades were in full-force globally. Throughout the 90s, Sega would really grow up and mature and have individual divisions, splitting into arcade and consumer software and product development. Many of the programmers, designers and planners of the 80s and earlier would become managers and producers of their own divisions.
Let’s start Part 2 off with the growth of their AM studios, which is short for Amusement Machine Research and Development.