Toshihiro Nagoshi shows support for Suda 51’s next game

Grasshopper Manufacture head/creative director Suda 51’s next project was revealed a couple of weeks back, and it has been attracting lots of attention. Called Lollipop Chainsaw, the game looks to be as crazy and over-the-top as Suda 51’s past releases, though this time he’ll have the help of James Gunn, who wrote the Dawn of the Dead remake a few years back, in the story department.

What makes this news Segabits worthy though is the interesting appearance of none other than SEGA’s Toshihiro Nagoshi, (Yakuza, Super Monkey Ball) who was on hand at a recent press event to voice his support for the title, praising Suda 51 for his “aggressive” games and his focus on creating new IP.

I’ve long thought that SEGA missed the boat by not opting to pick up the original No More Heroes for publishing a few years back, as Suda 51 seems in a lot of ways to embody the crazy spirit that SEGA’s games were known for back in the Dreamcast era. Lollipop Chainsaw will be published in Western territories by Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment (the recent Mortal Kombat game) who claim to want to expand Grasshopper Manufactures’ audience beyond its current fanbase. Here’s hoping for some success, Japan could use more successful new IP.

[Source: Andriasing]

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10 responses to “Toshihiro Nagoshi shows support for Suda 51’s next game

  1. Chaosmaster8753 says:

    Can’t wait to hear what Sharky has to say about this.

  2. George says:

    I don’t know about this title, but I will check out a demo when its out.

  3. -nSega54- says:

    Agreed, I was a bit disappointed by Shadows of the Damned and I don’t like the “Westernization” of Suda’s games lately, but they’re still fun to play and really, *really* funny. I’d love to see him go back to creating disturbing and complex works of art like Killer 7, though.

  4. matty says:

    The screenshots give a close feel to No More Heroes than Shadows (a game I honestly wasn’t feeling for in the first place), so depending on how the game actually play could be amazing.
    Or it could be like Dead Rising :/

    @nsega: GHM is definitely more open to the west than most Japanese companies. Even their HQ in Japan has quite few gaijin running around. Still, I’m not sure of their approach to the western audience.
    The games themselves don’t seem to cater to any particular quirks, but if their sales are anything to go by… Then again, I read that No More Heroes did not do too well in Japan, either when it was first released.

    Maybe these games are just for freaks, like me!

  5. Sega Uranus says:

    SEGA missed the boat with publishing No More Heroes? What? The game was a major failure and sucked ass anyways. Literally the perfect example of style over substance.

    Almost all of Suda51’s games are just incredibly awful, but he does have a neat wacky style I can appreciate… from a distance.

    I am not sure what you mean by his games embodying SEGA’s spirit as they have literally never made a game in a similar style as any of his (yes I know he made Shining Soul – we all know it is not his style though), and normally even SEGA’s worst games play better than all of his.

  6. -nSega54- says:

    “@nsega: GHM is definitely more open to the west than most Japanese companies. Even their HQ in Japan has quite few gaijin running around. Still, I’m not sure of their approach to the western audience.”

    Yeah, Shadows of the Damned was directed by a former Ubisoft employee. Definitely a company open to Western influence and Suda 51 loves America. It’s all good but I have to say I’m a little worried about where it could lead. I mean, it’s interesting that a Hollywood writer is helping with the story, but why? Suda 51 knows how to write an incredible story (See: Killer 7.)

    “SEGA missed the boat with publishing No More Heroes? What? The game was a major failure and sucked ass anyways. Literally the perfect example of style over substance.”

    The game was a major failure? It was successful enough to spawn a sequel and HD remake, which is more than can be said for 90% of Sega’s IP, so….I dunno. Not sure what you mean there. As for your opinion on “style over substance” see: MadWorld. No More Heroes had a hell of a lot more substance than MadWorld.

    Its sequel, NMH2, I’ll agree, was lame. But anyway, again, substance? Jet Grind Radio has no substance to speak of, doesn’t mean it wasn’t an amazing game… But yes, No More Heroes 1 had substance. Bosses required strategy to beat. The game wasn’t a cakewalk and it allowed you options in things like character and weapon customization.

    And if you don’t think Killer 7 had substance, then…wow.

    “I am not sure what you mean by his games embodying SEGA’s spirit as they have literally never made a game in a similar style as any of his”

    His style is doing whatever he wants and creating visually interesting games with tons of style, quirky writing, unique gameplay (‘cept Shadows of the Damned and No More Heroes 2) and endless surprises. But yes, he has a style all his own. I just think it’s a style that’s well-suited to Sega, just like the games from Platinum are.

  7. Annon says:

    I don’t think Sega’s style in the Dreamcast era was all mindless violence and immature jokes but rather games with diversity in genres with unique experiences. All I see from Suda are action games.

  8. -nSega54- says:

    Only Suda 51’s recent games are all mindless violence and immature jokes. I’d recommend checking out Killer 7, truly a mindfuck of an experience.

  9. matty says:

    “All I see from Suda are action games.”
    Flower, Sun & Rain
    Michigan
    The Silver Case
    Fatal Frame IV

    Not to mention the Fire Pro games. Not denying his games are sliding more towards the cliche side, but at least his games have *some* creative spark backing it up as opposed to some complete uninspired BULLSHIT we’re seeing of HOT NEW GAMES from EA, Ubi and every other company out there now. Love or hate his games, I’ll give him that much credit.

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